The Ultimate Guide to Lab-Grown Diamonds


The rising star of the jewelry market is the lab-grown diamond. Since their recent inception, these stones have skyrocketed in popularity and demand. However, it can be hard to understand what a lab-grown diamond is. This guide tells you everything you need to know about these gems.

Subscribe

To join our mailing list and never miss a baby update!

The Ultimate Guide to Lab-Grown Diamonds


The rising star of the jewelry market is the lab-grown diamond. Since their recent inception, these stones have skyrocketed in popularity and demand. However, it can be hard to understand what a lab-grown diamond is. This guide tells you everything you need to know about these gems.

Subscribe

To join our mailing list and never miss a baby update!

What are Lab-Grown Diamonds?


Lab-grown diamonds are synthetic diamonds crafted by scientists. Under careful supervision within a lab, the conditions that create a diamond in the earth can be reproduced quickly to develop new gemstones. These grown gems have the same chemical carbon composition and crystallization patterns as naturally produced diamonds. Because of this, many jewelry buyers are opting for these lab-grown jewels.

What are Lab-Grown Diamonds?



Lab-grown diamonds are synthetic diamonds crafted by scientists. Under careful supervision within a lab, the conditions that create a diamond in the earth can be reproduced quickly to develop new gemstones. These grown gems have the same chemical carbon composition and crystallization patterns as naturally produced diamonds. Because of this, many jewelry buyers are opting for these lab-grown jewels.

How it's Made


How it's Made


There are two main methods of creating lab diamonds. Both require a seed, a small fragment of natural diamond, to build the rest of the synthetic diamond from. The first method is high-pressure, high-temperature (HPHT) growth. Scientists take the seed, wrap it in natural carbon materials, and blast it with heat and pressure. These intense conditions mimic the natural processes that form earth diamonds over billions of years. As a result, the carbon materials around the seed are forced to join with it and crystalize.
The second method is newer and quickly growing in popularity. Chemical Vapor Deposition, or CVD, places the seed inside a chamber filled with carbon vapor gases. From there, the chamber is vacuum sealed and heated. The carbon vapors begin to stick to the seed, building a new diamond a molecule at a time. Because this method uses less heat, it is usually the preferred growth method.

There are two main methods of creating lab diamonds. Both require a seed, a small fragment of natural diamond, to build the rest of the synthetic diamond from. The first method is high-pressure, high-temperature (HPHT) growth. Scientists take the seed, wrap it in natural carbon materials, and blast it with heat and pressure. These intense conditions mimic the natural processes that form earth diamonds over billions of years. As a result, the carbon materials around the seed are forced to join with it and crystalize. The second method is newer and quickly growing in popularity. Chemical Vapor Deposition, or CVD, places the seed inside a chamber filled with carbon vapor gases. From there, the chamber is vacuum sealed and heated. The carbon vapors begin to stick to the seed, building a new diamond a molecule at a time. Because this method uses less heat, it is usually the preferred growth method.
Sale Off
Altair - Princess cut cluster ringAltair - Princess cut cluster ring
$1,550.00 USD

Isn't That Cubic Zirconia?


When talking about lab-grown diamonds, cubic zirconia often comes to mind. This gemstone looks nearly identical to natural diamonds and has been a popular alternative option in the past. However, they are not lab-grown diamonds. Cubic zirconia has an individual chemical composition, making it its own unique crystal. Lab-grown diamonds, on the other hand, are chemically identical to natural diamonds. They are a synthetic version identical to natural diamonds. So while cubic zirconia is a nice alternative to true diamonds, lab-grown diamonds are true diamonds.

Sale Off
Amour - Vintage Inspired Emerald Shaped Ring
$1,700.00 USD
Sale Off
Altair - Princess cut cluster ringAltair - Princess cut cluster ring
$1,550.00 USD

The Difference Between Natural and Lab Diamonds


A trained eye can notice minute differences between natural and grown diamonds despite the matching chemical makeups. The different conditions that create the crystals can lead to greatly different raw shapes between the two. Natural diamonds tend to have an eight-sided contour before being shaped to sit in jewelry. Grown diamonds, however, are contrasting. When crafted through the HPHT method, they grow into fourteen-sided shapes; through the CVD method, they grow into cubes.

Another difference is the sustainability of synthetic diamonds. Mining as a practice is precarious for workers and the environment. Digging carbon crystals out of the ground can also release many gases into the atmosphere. Labs, however, often use renewable energy to power the equipment used to grow new diamonds. Neither method is perfect, but some prefer the conditions where grown diamonds originate.

Finally, price is a factor separating natural and synthetic diamonds. Lab-grown diamond is a much quicker process that's typically done closer to home. Crafting, refining, and attaining these diamonds is a swifter and more straightforward process. Therefore, the labor costs for these jewels are much lower. The resale value of lab diamonds is also lower. If you're viewing your jewelry as an investment, what kind of diamond to use is an important consideration.


Evaluation


Evaluating different diamonds will show how they're sourced. Grown diamonds often have a microscopic inscription on the side that denotes it as lab-made. These inscriptions are small numbers that can be searched to identify the lab and methodology used to craft the gemstone, along with many other details on its making. Some natural diamonds will also have a small carved number that labels it as a mined gem. An experienced jeweler can help distinguish the two. 

Other than distinguishing it as a synthetic diamond, it can be evaluated similarly to a typical diamond. For example, color grade, clarity, traditional or modern cuts, and carats can all be reviewed in a lab-grown diamond through the same means as a natural one. 

The lab-grown diamond is a fantastic, economical, sustainable alternative to the natural gemstone. 

Center Stone


The center stone is the first thing to consider when choosing an engagement ring. Starting with the shape can determine the overlook of the ring. A larger stone will look better with a split shank, but if she likes the look of an extra thin band engagement ring, a larger diamond weight will tend to spin, whereas a smaller diamond will better achieve that look. Just to let you know, the size of the stone doesn't necessarily reflect the cost of the ring. For example, a large emerald cut diamond can cost less than a smaller, brilliant cut diamond. 

Isn't That Cubic Zirconia?


When talking about lab-grown diamonds, cubic zirconia often comes to mind. This gemstone looks nearly identical to natural diamonds and has been a popular alternative option in the past. However, they are not lab-grown diamonds. Cubic zirconia has an individual chemical composition, making it its own unique crystal. Lab-grown diamonds, on the other hand, are chemically identical to natural diamonds. They are a synthetic version identical to natural diamonds. So while cubic zirconia is a nice alternative to true diamonds, lab-grown diamonds are true diamonds.


The Difference Between Natural and Lab Diamonds



diamonds despite the matching chemical makeups. The different conditions that create the crystals can lead to greatly different raw shapes between the two. Natural diamonds tend to have an eight-sided contour before being shaped to sit in jewelry. Grown diamonds, however, are contrasting. When crafted through the HPHT method, they grow into fourteen-sided shapes; through the CVD method, they grow into cubes.

Another difference is the sustainability of synthetic diamonds. Mining as a practice is precarious for workers and the environment. Digging carbon crystals out of the ground can also release many gases into the atmosphere. Labs, however, often use renewable energy to power the equipment used to grow new diamonds. Neither method is perfect, but some prefer the conditions where grown diamonds originate.

Finally, price is a factor separating natural and synthetic diamonds. Lab-grown diamond is a much quicker process that's typically done closer to home. Crafting, refining, and attaining these diamonds is a swifter and more straightforward process. Therefore, the labor costs for these jewels are much lower. The resale value of lab diamonds is also lower. If you're viewing your jewelry as an investment, what kind of diamond to use is an important consideration.

Center Stone


The center stone is the first thing to consider when choosing an engagement ring. Starting with the shape can determine the overlook of the ring. A larger stone will look better with a split shank, but if she likes the look of an extra thin band engagement ring, a larger diamond weight will tend to spin, whereas a smaller diamond will better achieve that look. Just to let you know, the size of the stone doesn't necessarily reflect the cost of the ring. For example, a large emerald cut diamond can cost less than a smaller, brilliant cut diamond. 

Evaluation


Evaluating different diamonds will show how they're sourced. Grown diamonds often have a microscopic inscription on the side that denotes it as lab-made. These inscriptions are small numbers that can be searched to identify the lab and methodology used to craft the gemstone, along with many other details on its making. Some natural diamonds will also have a small carved number that labels it as a mined gem. An experienced jeweler can help distinguish the two. 

Other than distinguishing it as a synthetic diamond, it can be evaluated similarly to a typical diamond. For example, color grade, clarity, traditional or modern cuts, and carats can all be reviewed in a lab-grown diamond through the same means as a natural one. 

The lab-grown diamond is a fantastic, economical, sustainable alternative to the natural gemstone.